Barnardos Calls on Government Not to Row Back on Gains Made in Poverty Reduction

04 Dec 2008

PRESS RELEASE

Barnardos Calls on Government Not to Row Back on Gains Made in Poverty Reduction

Nearly 40% of all people in consistent poverty in 2007 were children

3rd December 2008 - Barnardos are today calling for the Government to ensure the modest gains made in poverty reduction in 2007 are not reversed through any further cuts in essential social services and especially on services to children and families.

Responding to the newly released Survey on Income and Living Conditions (SILC) in Ireland by the CSO, Barnardos Director of Advocacy Norah Gibbons said, "The figures released today have shown a modest decrease in the rate of children living in consistent poverty, a decrease which was to be expected following such a long period of sustained and un-precedented economic growth in Ireland.

"However, with a worsening economic climate and newly released figures on huge increases in the numbers of unemployed compared to this time last year we have every reason to believe that without a commitment from Government to continue this downward trend in poverty rates, these small gains could easily be lost."

Commenting on today's report Fergus Finlay, Chief Executive of Barnardos said , "Despite the decrease in rates of consistent poverty children remained one of the most vulnerable groups in society in 2007. Nearly 40% of all people in consistent poverty were children. This represents a burden that our youngest and most vulnerable are unjustly bearing the brunt of."

Mr. Finlay continued, "With the Institute of Public Health in Ireland yesterday revealing that the current economic pressures are forcing families to choose between heat and food this winter it is incumbent on the Government to do everything possible to ensure our country's children do not suffer further."

For more information contact:
Yolanda Kennedy (01) 708 0423/ 086 386 0638
Lucinda McNally (01) 7080442; 086-824 8408

 

 

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